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Health & Wellness

How Terry Bradshaw is Embracing His Boomer Years

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Terry Bradshaw, football legend, actor and Fox NFL analyst talks candidly about being a baby boomer.

Terry Bradshaw, one of the most famous quarterbacks in history, is also a sports commentator, actor and TV personality. He has an action-packed lifestyle that keeps him on the move, even at the age of 70. His career and hobbies don’t seem to be slowing down anytime soon, which means staying healthy is a top priority.

He is now quarterbacking a new endeavor with the All About Your Boom campaign to help make sure baby boomers, like him, know about the potential risks and importance of helping to protect themselves against pneumococcal pneumonia. The Get Old team recently sat down with Terry to ask him why this is such an important message for those who are 65 or older in particular.  Here’s what he had to say: 

Get Old: TELL US ABOUT THE ALL ABOUT YOUR BOOM™ CAMPAIGN AND WHY YOU CHOSE TO GET INVOLVED?

Terry:  My career has always depended on being healthy and active – and staying healthy off the field has been just as important. I just hit the big 7-0 (I know, I don’t look a day over 55), but I’m just getting started on all the things I want to do – continuing to act, spending time with my family, raising horses on my ranch, traveling and checking off items on that bucket list of mine.

That’s why it’s important to do what I can to help ensure I stay healthy, like eating right, exercising and staying up to date on CDC-recommended adult vaccinations. I don’t want a disease like pneumococcal pneumonia to hold me back from doing what makes me happy – especially if I can take steps to prevent it.  At this point in my life, it’s “all about my boom.”

Get Old:  WHAT IS IT LIKE BEING A SPOKESPERSON FOR A CAMPAIGN LIKE THIS?

Terry:  It’s been rewarding to be part of something that could help people take action toward protecting their own health. Of course, I’ve had a little bit of fun along the way, too. I got to star in a video that shows how pneumococcal pneumonia could disrupt your life – with a Terry Bradshaw spin on it. In the video, I’m pitching a fictitious timeshare resort, “Bradshaw World,” to baby boomers with some really funny and unusual amenities – you have to see it to believe it – and then I get serious with them about pneumococcal pneumonia. You can learn more in this video.

Get Old:  HOW CAN PEOPLE 65 OR OLDER HELP PROTECT THEMSELVES AGAINST PNEUMOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA?

In working on the All About Your Boom™ campaign, I learned that even if we feel healthy, our immune system weakens as we age – it’s just part of getting older.1 In fact, with pneumococcal pneumonia, adults 65 or older are over 10 times more likely to be hospitalized with pneumococcal pneumonia than adults 18-49.2

During an annual check-up, or when getting the flu shot, is a great time for boomers to speak with their doctors about ensuring they are up to date with all CDC-recommended vaccinations, and to ask if pneumococcal pneumonia vaccination is right for them.

Get Old:  WHY IS IT IMPORTANT FOR YOU TO STAY UP TO DATE ON VACCINATIONS?

Terry: In speaking with my doctor, I understand that vaccination is one way to help protect myself against certain potentially serious diseases. With the All About Your Boom™ campaign, I learned that pneumococcal pneumonia can strike anywhere, anytime. It can really mess up your life – and now that I know, I want my fellow baby boomers to be aware that they are at increased risk for pneumococcal pneumonia, even if they are healthy, and that they should talk to their doctor about how to help prevent it.1

Get Old:  WHERE CAN PEOPLE GO FOR MORE INFORMATION?

Terry: No one wants to sign up for pneumococcal pneumonia. If you’re 65 or older, talk to your doctor about whether vaccination to help prevent pneumococcal pneumonia is right for you. You can also get more information at AllAboutYourBoom.com.

ABOUT PNEUMOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA

Get Old also spoke with Dr. William Gruber, Senior Vice President, Vaccine Clinical Research and Development at Pfizer, to learn about the impact pneumococcal pneumonia can have on baby boomers and why they are at higher risk.

Get Old: TELL US WHY PNEUMOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA IS SO SERIOUS?

Dr. Gruber: Pneumococcal pneumonia is the most common type of bacterial pneumonia and can be spread through coughing or close contact. Common symptoms of pneumococcal pneumonia include fever, excessive sweating, shaking chills, coughing, difficulty breathing, shortness of breath and chest pain.3 Certain symptoms, like cough and fatigue, may last for weeks or longer.4 Even in otherwise healthy and active adults like Terry, the immune system weakens as we age, increasing the risk for potentially serious infections.5 Adults age 65 or older should ask about CDC-recommended vaccinations, including recommendations for vaccination against pneumococcal pneumonia, during their annual check-up.

 

References:
1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Pneumococcal Disease: Risk Factors & Transmission. http://www.cdc.gov/pneumococcal/about/risk-transmission.html.  Accessed September 4, 2018. 
2. Ramirez, J. Adults Hospitalized with Pneumonia in the United States: Incidence, Epidemiology and Mortality. Open Forum Infectious Diseases. 2017; 4: Figure 2. 
3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms & Complications. http://www.cdc.gov/pneumococcal/about/symptoms-complications.html.  Accessed September 4, 2018. 
4. Mandell G, Bennett J, Dolin R. Mandell, Douglas and Bennett2’s Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 7th Edition. Streptococcus Pneumoniae. 2623-2642. 
5. Weinberger B, Herndler-Brandstetter D, Schwanninger A, et al. Biology of immune responses to vaccines in elderly persons. Clin Infect Dis. 2008; 46:1078-1084.

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